Forest Hill Retreat – Birds in Nova Scotia

In one of our last blog posts we published a lift of mammals in Nova Scotia. Today we want to serve the bird lovers among us. Our personal favorite birds are bold eagles,  loons, and hummingbirds.

The bold eagle truly is the king among the birds. In the whole Forest Hill and Guysborough area there are many, and you can almost count on seeing an eagle every day.

 

 

The loon is a very beautiful bird and you can hear its call over the whole lake. ¬†When I hear the loon, I know that I’m at home on the lake.

 

 

The hummingbird is another daily companion in Nova Scotia…at least during the warm seasons. It is small, fragile and very beautiful. It’s worth to hang up a hummingbird feeder before the window or somewhere in the yard to see this tiny beauty in action.

 

As a dweller in Forest Hill one should also know the Canada goose. That bird visits Nova Scotia twice a year: in Spring and Autumn. Then large swarms fill the air with their gaggle and you can hear them from far.

 

 

The Blue Jay is a frequent guest in yards and gardens. With its beautiful blue colors it is a nice contrast to the mainly green environment.

 

 

As an animal lover one should not only feed the hummingbirds but all birds. Because of the cell phone radiation and the many toxins in the air a bird’s life can be pretty hard these days. Therefore we would love to see as many bird species as possible find a home in Forest Hill.

It is our hope that our future inhabitants of Forest Hill will provide bird feeders in their yards. Feeding bird requires regular presence and some discipline. Because once we humans begin to feed birds, they get used to and count on us to be their providers. If there is no food for a while they fly away or even die.

Nova Scotians are quite creativ when it comes to protect bird feeders from other animals, mainly squirrels. Many even provide a special feeding place for squirrels only far away from the bird feeders.

Since we don’t know which bird species interest you the most, and since there live over 400 different kinds of birds in Nova Scotia, we ask you to visit whatbird.com. On that page you will find a long list of birds in Nova Scotia and you can also read the description.

We would be very pleased to see your comments, critiques, or questions in the comment box below this article.

We wish you a lot of fun with your personal ornithological studies.

Your Iten Family

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